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rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervisor mar: i had to move from being a regular person that barely gets his kid to school on time and makes her a healthy lunch to having to go to a photo opportunities. i was on the school board for eight years, i had some training. and i was in the democratic party central committee for years before that and was one
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
for civil rights. we'll tell you how japanese-americans heroically overcame their darkest hour. >> it's been called the most powerful office in the world, and you can get a chance to sit in it. >> stay with me now. some almond milk and spinach -- i promise you it's delicious. >> in "speak of the week," we'll find out just how well you know your parents. >> to go from this... to this is pretty easy if you know how. we'll get some great makeup tips from the experts at teen vogue. >> all that and more, next on "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> we've all heard the story of iron man. he's the comic-book superhero who chose to help mankind after suffering near-fatal injuries. nicole introduces us to iron heart, a real-life hero who's helping others after he, too, suffered near-fatal injuries. >> it was just a regular summer day, and i was crossing a local intersection on my way home from some practice, and i was struck in my driver's side door by a speeding dump truck, and the injuries were catastrophic. >> brian was 1
for support for artistic people that looked nothing like me. this is a civil rights issue. we all have to be included. host: we are talking about the federal response to the rise in optimism with ari ne'eman, the president and co-founder of the artistic self advocacy network -- autistic self advocacy network. our next call comes from florida. go ahead, please. are you there? go right ahead, please. caller: i need to know -- what do you do with a 20-year-old and a 22-year-old that was diagnosed -- has been on medication ever since they were about five years old, and they go from doctor to doctor, and when they take their medication, they look bleary eyed, and we have tried every kind of medication, but they cannot communicate, and the school that they were in -- have been in -- they have been in a group where some of the kids were so bad until they could not -- you cannot learn where there is so much confusion. you can sit down one-on-one with them, and they can pick up some things, and they can easily remember telephone numbers and things that are exciting -- they can remember that, bu
civil rights. but as the tool has become a regular tool of political warfare, scrutiny of the procedure has increased and questions raised about its impact on the chamber. now, reid and other senate democrats want to change the rules to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed to formally begin debate on a bill; and require a "talking filibuster," forcing senators to make their case on the floor for hours and hours, like jimmy stewart did in the 1939 film "mr. smith goes to washington." >> i'm not, and i'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause. >> holman: or former south carolina senator strom thurmond, who spoke for over 24 hours in an attempt to defeat the civil rights act of 1957. but in today's senate, where 60 votes are needed to pass almost any piece of legislation, it means even the threat of a filibuster can gum up the process. democratic leader harry reid says enough is enough. >> we have this crazy idea, mr. president, that if we're going to have a filibuster, you have to stand and say something, not hide in your office someplace or go to a wedding that you're h
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
you for the support. although we're finding out in this city a lot of people civic and civil rights are being cut back on. we hope you, the board of supervisors, will be like the board of supervisors who brought forth the medical marijuana that now 25 states enjoy. supervisors to create codes and sros will be coming here december 4. you know sros, you talk about domestic violence, you talk about homophobia, racism. it's inside now. people want to get up from the sheets and run to the street, whether they naked or not. you know the naked truth is that we really want you guys to do what chris daly did. he's the only one that built apartments on the corner of bank burger king. the united states two weeks ago we voted for the president. two weeks today. they emo he that the -- know the united states politicians are working three days a week and no times for the citizens. we don't want you to reflect that. i want to remember you board of supervisors. when ross was the supervisor here you only making 33,000. we voted that youz/( -w would me over 115 so that you could do the work -- to san
've considered and housing for broadly and civil rights more broadly. >> i will use an analogy. i was raised in the country. elephant needed to have a pen, and also a stable, you would ask someone where can i get these facilities. you certainly wouldn't expect that person to direct you to a beehive. and a beehive is where worker bees live. and a stable is where you have larger groups of people that could possibly be there. and since, you know, it's been decided that, you know, oftentimes elephants can't live in beehives, that i suggest that perhaps a beehive isn't as valuable to a city that needs an elephant pen. thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> i'm going to be using the overhead. this is my son. can i use the overhead? >> president chiu: sfgov-tv. august 14, 2006. i just want to sayƧ&%( [ that we talking about violence versus nudity. i'm not bringing that up. "k about my child seeing nudity, but i'm worried about them seeing guns and i'm also -- we can continue -- we continue to be ignored as mothers and fathers. every year, every day, every holiday, every birthday, we are ignor
issuu act on that it can backfire in lots of different ways. i am concerned about civil rights, i'm concerned about free speech, i'm concerned about just changing san francisco's style and how we are as a city. and it's something that's very troubling to me to see that. we're a city that actually had -- the publication of city life that naked lunch came out there was a ban about that. the city looks at free speech and expression, we're a beacon of light to other places around the country and sometimes there's weirdness about how we express ourselves but i think that is what is great about san francisco. i have something teed up that i was saving for before, for chris daly when he used the f word in the board chambers but i think this is more appropriate. catch-22. and think it expresses some of the absurdity of this that we have in the backdrop of world war ii where people are killing each other, the inconsequential nudity that is before the general is sh something that is quite meaningless over all. >> why aren't you wearing clothes, captain? >> don't wanna. >> what do you mean y
to the podium. she's a civil right and it's also a small business owner. >> thank you, my aunt. my work has been to protect the most vulnerable and i've joined fix the debt because one of the core principles is that we don't go up the fiscal cliff and they don't make sacrifices that crushed the most vulnerable populations. and so, i stand here to speak for those groups. we recognize the importance of doing true reform, true building revenue, true reform and reducing debt where we can, but not at the expense of the state did not for all of us. and all our interests have to be the same. all of us need to contribute to reducing debt to and removing us from this class. it is not an option for an action. if we have not, the people who are least likely to survive it are the ones who will be hit the hardest and hit first. i want to leave you with a bible verse because that's what they do. and it's philippines chapter two verse four. each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others. >> thank you very much. next i'd like to invite up trend to come and media spec
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
about it or were willing to put everything on the line to make it happen. but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in a sense. they were factional. the fact is that the filibusters done by southern democratic senators who opposed civil rights are voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans. just as they were by a non-southern democrats. and the fact is that civil rights legislation and overcoming those filibusters are being enacted were as much to the credit and responsibility of the senate minority leader as lyndon johnson. so what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster tool. the entire party is fashioned by the majority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not simply on those issues where the majority leader though the amendment. but on issues and nominations which ultimately passed unanimously or near unanimously. keep in mind nominations, in which he denied unanimous consent, in some instances have been the luster, a lot of them on executive nomination, you don't have amendme
opened the doors for civil rights, inspired a generation, and literally took us to the moon. get a copy of "jack kennedy, elusive hero." it makes a fabulous, affordable gift for people who share your ideals. it's a paperback, it's cheaper. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
things. it's about a young leader who opened the doors for civil rights, inspired a generation, and literally took us to the moon. get a copy of "jack kennedy, elusive hero." it makes a fabulous, affordable gift for people who share your ideals. it's a paperback, it's cheaper. we'll be right back. +9@> >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to take them to a win. back in the 1950s the moderate wing of the republican party was coming off defeat until general dwight d. eisenhower came in creating what would later be called eisenhower republicans, a group that seems near extinction. evans thomas is author of a new book that is getting great reviews. and david eisenhower, for whom camp david was named, is the grandson of ike. >>> we're back. the republican party, as we just said, is in a soul searching mode right now looking to explain its loss and find a new candidate to get them to win. back in the 1950s, the and by a landslide in 1956. >> your thoughts about his legacy then
baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the media should be raising here? >> t
. >>> syria may have no working internet right now, but the fighting is raging on. the country's civil war is focusing right now on damascus international airport on the outskirts of the capital. they have surrounded it on one side and trying to keep the war jets grounded and stop its flow of weapons. syrian state-run tv insists the airport is functioning normally, though. >>> ford is issuing a voluntary recall of its 2013 escape and fusion models today. there are reports of engines overheating and then vehicle fires when the engine is running. there have been no injuries reported, but if you own one of these models, ford wants you to contact the dealer immediately. repair procedures, they don't know about those yet. >>> today 17-year-old jordan davis will be laid to rest in an atlanta suburb. the high school senior was shot to death at a florida gas station following a disagreement about loud music. 45-year-old michael dunn is charged with davis' murder in a case that remind some of the trayvon martin shooting in florida. but dunn's attorney said there is no comparison here and her client
of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was about computer modeling, which at the time was relatively primitive. i was wrong about that. the real story was about--the real evidence had-held in the ice cores up to antarctica to to arctic. once i took time to stop and understand the empirical evosed to my my misconceptions. i started this in the late 90s but it wasn't until 2005 when the ice work started get going that i got locked into the trajectory that became the movie and ice survey. >> jennifer: you're in position to provide other i am empirical evidence, which is what your film is about. what is happening with the film? do you think it's ch
engage in that follow-up if people want to help us. our community faces real civil and human rights challenges. we can face them together. host: ari ne'eman is president and co-founder of the autistic self advocacy network. it is a nonprofit organization run by and you can go to their web site at >> you want to tell our viewers and listeners what to expect. we begin with a conversation einstein on thesc simpson-bowles commission. later on we will be talking about the defense capabilities section georgia at the government accountability office regarding whether it detainees at quintana mold they can be kept at one of six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. -- at guantanamo bay and whether they can be kept at one of the six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. this is in it. we will see you again tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up today, and look back at the 1990 budget deal followed by the president of the european parliament on the eu and u.
's civil war is focusing right new on damascus international airport on the outskirts of the capital there. rebels say they have surrounded it on one side. they are trying to keep the government's war jets grounded and stop its flow of weapons. syrian state-run tv insists the airport is functioning normally. >>> mexico will swear in a new president in just a few hours when enrique pena nieto takes the oath. he named his new cabinet yesterday, you see him here. he also took control of the armed forces in a traditional midnight ceremony. >> teaching children with autism isn't always easy, but help may be on the way from an unexpected place. an ipad app and a green robot. joe carter has more in today's "start small, think big." >> reporter: children with autism are getting help from a friendly creature. >> it's a robotic system designed to help people with autism learn and practice skills in a fun way. >> can you help me? >> reporter: like making their bed or brushing their teeth. students at children's institute of pittsburgh are testing the system. they can play with popchilla and interact
in march last year, but it slowly grew into a civil war -- air strikes, gun battles, car bombings. the violence has taken its toll. a human rights group based in britain says more than 40,000 people have died. through it all, president assad and his administration have hung on to power. a spokesperson for the syrian national coalition argues getting rid of assad requires a two-track approach. walid al bunni says nations need to isolate the president and su. >> we have two ways -- putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime, and then this would be useful, or supporting militarily the opposition or the interfering by the nato to make free zone and no-fly zone. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take
are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2, we have gone from the dais where jerry cohen was the only lawyer -- the days where jerry cohen was the only lawyer in china to 17,000 law firms. as away from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors an
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
a vote walked right out of the hall. activists say the measure could limit civil lishedz in a big way. among other things increases the influence of sharia law and commits the state to protecting morlgs and the quote traditional family. the document does strengthen bans on torture and arbitrary arrests. also curbs executive power and pliments presidential terms. this comes just after the president there mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers basically made himself a dictator. that's what first triggered the protests and less than two years after the fall of egypt's aauthoritarian leader hosni mom bark many egyptians fear their new leader and islamist allies are putting the country back on the path toward dictatorship. steve harrigan live in cairo. steve, any sign the president is willing to concede on any of this? shepard, president morsey has made no moves on compromise. one thing we have seen from supporters in the muslim brotherhood the care shown in trying to avoid any conflict or violence in the square here. that's certainly going to be put to the test tomorrow. that'
-span: what was custer's luck? >> guest: custer's luck was an expression that people made up during the civil war to explain his incredibly fast rise to prominence, that he was always in the right place at the right time. it seems to me that you have to give custer credit for more than this. he was in the right place at the right time, but he knew how to make the most of those opportunities which many people would not. i think, for example, of what happened to another man who was appointed brigadier general at the same time that custer was, elon farnsworth. both of them became generals right before the battle of gettysburg. both were under the command of general judson kilpatrick, whose nickname was "kill cavalry" because he was so reckless with the men under his command. custer managed to somehow get his orders from kilpatrick countermanded by another general, and as a result, he played a significant part in the battle of gettysburg. when pickett was charging against the union front, stuart was coming around the rear with the idea that they would cut the union forces in half. custer actually
anybody has the answer to that right now. sort of on the definition of insanity. we're doing the same thing over and over again. doing the same thing we did in libya. getting involved in yet again in a civil war in a muslim country and i'm not sure why we expect different results. and i wonder what those senators will have to say in a year or two or five if we provide a surface to air missile that gets used to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> seth, isn't that the problem? what we saw in libya was all those weapons have gone missing. now they're elsewhere in northern africa and some got into the hands of hamas in gaza. syria seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the things that could go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms. they can do a lot with just that kind of activity. and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the country. they need help in a
with the community-based agencies and civil rights organizations that have had a very delivered reason to engage me on this, we will not be implementing the stop and frisk programs or variations of that here in san francisco. [applause] we do not wish to be distracted from the real reason we are here. we love our kids. we love our families in the bayview whether they are in sunnyvale or alice griffith or potrero hill or in the mission. we love them so much that we have to do more to care for them. we have to find those connections. [applause] there are too many stories that we are hearing from our clergy when it is too late. when we are having those individual funerals, when our parents and their brothers and sisters are crying over things that have already happened, where the jobs that we are creating did not reach these unfortunate young kids or our police commissioners and police chief working in concert with adult probation, juvenile probation, did not quite get the person who signed these papers, put their names to it saying, "i will not go back to where our was found with a gun or associate w
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)